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HLF-4 in Busan

Overview

HLF-4 participants in discussion
<Opening speech by president Myung-Bak Lee at HLF-4>
Korea hosted the 4th High Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness (HLF-4), held at Busan BEXCO from November 29 to December 1, 2011. The forum was concluded with a unanimous adoption of the outcome document, Busan Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation. Participants included UN Secretary General Ki-Moon Ban, Rwandan president Paul Kagame, Ethiopian prime minister Meles Zenawi, Queen Rania of Jordan, US Secretary of State Hilary Clinton, OECD Secretary-General Angel Gurria, former British prime minister Tony Blaire, former Australian prime minister (and current minister for foreign affairs) Kevin Rudd, and other well-recognized figures from around the world. It was one of the largest scale forums with a total of 3,000 participants including representatives from 160 countries (100 ministers or equivalents), 70 international organizations (40 chiefs), NGOs, congresses, and business corporations. Korea led HLF-4 in a fruitful direction with discussions on “effective development” based on its own experience of development and succeeded in eliciting consensus from emerging countries such as China and India.

Outcomes of the HLF-4

Global consensus on MDGs

Representatives of 160 countries gathered at HLF-4 in Busan reaffirmed the global community’s strong resolve towards achieving the common goals of MDGs (Millennium Development Goals). Held at a critical time with 4 years remaining to meet the target timeframe for MDGs, the forum provided important momentum for global efforts to eradicate poverty and promote sustainable growth.

Busan Partnership for Effective Development

Participants of HLF-4 agreed on a new Global Partnership encompassing all development actors as expressed in "Busan Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation". The new Global Partnership is especially meaningful in that it extends the boundary of development cooperation - which previously focused on developed countries as donors and the developing world as recipients - to incorporate emerging economies (such as China, India and Brazil) as well as NGOs and the private sector.

HLF-4 participants in discussion
<HLF-4 participants in discussion>
Participants of HLF-4 agreed on a new Global Partnership encompassing all development actors as expressed in "Busan Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation". The new Global Partnership is especially meaningful in that it extends the boundary of development cooperation - which previously focused on developed countries as donors and the developing world as recipients - to incorporate emerging economies (such as China, India and Brazil) as well as NGOs and the private sector.

It is particularly notable that China and India, who are emerging power players in the global economy and leaders of South-South cooperation, are part of the consensus, making the Busan Partnership truly “global.” Built on common goals and shared values, the partnership is expected to contribute to improving the effectiveness of global development cooperation in respecting the different roles and capacities of diverse actors.

Paradigm expansion from aid effectiveness to effective development

Recognizing the need for development efforts beyond the conventional aid, the Busan Partnership includes a commitment for effective development involving diverse parties, channels and methods. It recognizes South-South and triangular cooperation and the role of the private sector, while emphasizing the need to prevent corruption and illegal cash flows as well as to effectively use climate change funds.

Int'l discussions since the 2005 Paris Declaration had been focused on the technicality of aid provision. The Busan Partnership set the foundation for a more comprehensive paradigm for development cooperation to involve diverse issues that influence development outcomes, including financial resources other than ODA, methods of cooperation, and impact from other policies.

Consensus on the post-Busan framework

HLF-4 participants agreed on the post-Busan framework for the effective implementation of the outcome of the Busan forum. The framework focuses on accommodating the needs and circumstances of partner countries based on the principle of “country heavy and global light”, supported by OECD-UNDP cooperation.

The participants also agreed to launch a Global Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation, which will be followed through using specific measures to be determined by June 2012.

Korea’s Role and Achievement

Korea’s Role and Achievement

As the host of HLF-4, the Korean government and the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade successfully fulfilled the role of handling the preparation, organization, management and promotion of the forum. The HLF-4 Organizing Office, led by ambassador Seong-Hwa Hong, directed the administrative and protocol details, while the Development Cooperation Bureau of the foreign ministry managed negotiations on the forum agenda and outcome document.

Despite a number of challenges with 3,000 participants (an exceptionally large number compared to 1,700 participants at the 2008 forum held in Accra, Ghana) and over 40 events, seminars and knowledge sharing sessions held alongside the forum, the HLF-4 was well managed, and the seamless planning of the forum was well received by the participants.

Korea also played a leading role in the forum’s substantive matters with the Development Cooperation Bureau and the Permanent Delegation of the ROK to the OECD participating in discussions and negotiations regarding the forum agenda during the past year. They carried out critical functions in the process of deriving the Busan Partnership, including women’s issues in the forum agenda, and forming a consensus on the post-Busan framework.

In particular, Korea successfully fulfilled its role as a mediator between traditional donor countries and the emerging world by making consistent and strategic efforts in terms of negotiation and diplomacy vis-a-vis China and India, who became important members of the Busan Partnership.

Sharing Korea’s development knowhow with the global community

Korea led the discussion on “effective development” based on its own experience of successful development and shared its success factors, including effective institutions, contribution from the private sector and capacity-building for women, which were all reflected in the Busan Partnership. Following the success of the 2010 Seoul G20 Summit, where it led the adoption of the development agenda, Korea once again reaffirmed its status as a leader of global issues.

Busan Global Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation

As agreed during the HIgh Level Forum on Aid Effectiveness, the global community focused on following through on the results of the Busan Forum, by holding three Post-Busan Interim Group(PBIG) meetings. Such efforts resulted in the successful launch of the Global Partnership for Effective Development Cooperation during the final meeting of the OECD DAC Wor